A frothy confection of lace  designed by Victor Stiebel  (1907-1976).  Dress has the  typical fitted bodice of the  fifties and billowing skirt.  Model holds lace handkerchief.     Date: 1950s

Hankies through history

Thought handkerchiefs were a bygone of yesteryear? Join the Inquisitive Archivist for a whistle stop tour of hankies through history and their many applications, via the pictures held in our fabulous archive.

  1. A good nose blow.

A man disturbing the peace in a residential area. 1935

2. For the prevention of the spread of disease.

WW2 - Coughs and Sneezes Bletchley Park.

3. For impromptu morris dancing.

A group of morris men performing a handkerchief dance in Town Street Date: 1948 - 1952

4. For moping your fevered brow.

A young sailor on a hot day in London, wiping his face with a handkerchief. Date: 15 June 1934

5. For locating your car.

A view across the car-parking field at the Royal Show, Oxford, with a car flying a handkerchief from its radio aerial in the foreground Date: Jul 1959

6. For crime scene cover ups…

Murder weapon Date:

7. …or as a weapon in itself, in this 1911 photo sequence from The Sketch showing, ‘the gentle mouchoir as a formidable weapon…for wiping the floor with an opponent’.

A series of photographs from The Sketch showing, 'the gentle mouchoir as a formidable weapon...for wiping the floor with an opponent'. Date: 1911

8. For expressions of allegiance or identity.

Printed cotton handkerchief. 'Rally round the flag' First world war souvenir. British Tommy with union flag. Surround of flags and allied forces. Zouave. Gurkha. Russian. Sikh. 1918

9. For a hobo’s bindle…

Three female hobos Date:

10.…or as a handy napkin for when dining al fresco on the road.

Illustration by Cecil Aldin, Jack and Jill. Jack the dog and Jill the cat, tired and hungry on their journey, are given something to eat by a friendly stonebreaker. Date: 1914

11. For a commemorative souvenir.

A silk handkerchief commemorating the Coronation of King Edward VIII, planned for 15 May 1937 but in fact, never staged due to the King's Abdication in December 1936. Date: 1936

12. As a thoughtful gift.

How Betty can make a Christmas hankie for mother, page of instructions in a brochure, Dy-o-la Dyes. Date: 1920s

13. For filtering out noxious fumes.

A lady is choked by smokers as she walks along the pavement Date: 1843

14. As a first aid tourniquet or(for larger hankies)a sling.

Temporary Treatment of Bone Fractures, including rifle used as a splint, cricket bat used as a splint, slings, triangular bandages, shawl caps, huntsman's whips used as splint, bayonet used as a splint and handkerchiefs used for bandaging purposes. All most practical applications of available resources at the likely site of such injuries occurring. Date: circa 1880s

15. As a seaside sun hat.

Holiday makers on an crowded beach with an elderly couple in the foreground and Blackpool Tower visible in the distance Date: 1946 - 1955

16. As a stylish fashion accessory.

Original design by Gordon Conway for a soft satin dinner dress, January 1930. The dress was designed on princess lines, ankle-length in front and longer behind. The jewellery was of white and yellow crystals with a matching colour chiffon handkerchief. Date: 1930

17. For having a good blub into.

1950s Woman With Handkerchief Sneezing Indoor

18. As a vehicle for eau-de-cologne.

advertising, cosmetics, 4711, real eau-de-cologne, slogan: Immer fruehlingsfrisch (anytime springtime fresh, made by: Ferd. Muelhens, Cologne, Germany, circa 1939, Date:

19. To perform magic tricks to impress your friends.

1950s, coin in handkerchief, trick, game, schooldays. Date:

20. For bidding fond farewells!

'The Aviator is the only man girls look up to' A very beautifully drawn and interesting postcard, with strong leaning toward the Women's Suffrage movement during this period in the United Kingdom. These strong and confident women see that the only time it is necessary to 'look up' at a man is when he is flying above in an aeroplane. Date: circa 1910